CITI Talk: “Medium Access Protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks” by Abdelmalik Bachir, Biskra University, Algeria in Amphi Chappe, June 20th 2017

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Abstract
There has been a growing interest on understanding and optimizing Wireless Sensor Network MAC protocols in recent years, where the limited and constrained resources have driven research towards primarily reducing energy consumption of MAC functionalities. In this talk, we expose the prime focus of WSN MAC protocols, design guidelines that inspired these protocols, as well as drawbacks and shortcomings of the existing solutions and how existing and emerging technology will influence future solutions.

Bio
Abdelmalik Bachir received the graduate degree from the National Institute of Informatics, Algiers, Algeria, in 2001, the DEA diploma in informatics from the University of Marseille, France, in 2002, and the PhD degree from Grenoble Institute of Technology, France, in 2007. He took research positions at Avignon University, France Telecom R&D, Grenoble Institute of Technology, Imperial College London, as well as CERIST Research Centre, Algiers. Currently, he is a professor at Biskra University, Algeria and a consultant at Imperial Innovations. His research interests include: MAC and Routing protocols for wireless networks, wireless network deployment optimisation, mobile user mobility profiling, and inter-vehicle communication.


CITI Talk: “Entropy and Cost of Anti Uniform Huffman Codes” by Daniela Tarniceriu, Technical University “Gh. Asachi” of Iasi, Romania in Amphi Chappe, June 12th

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Abstract

In this talk, the class of anti-uniform Huffman (AUH) codes for anti-uniform sources with finite and infinite alphabets is considered. The characteristics of such sources as well as Huffman codes for such sources are first recalled. The sequence of bits corresponding to the output of a anti-uniform source encoded with a Huffman code is modeled by a Markov source. Its characteristics are derived from the encoding procedure describing the Huffman code. The Huffman encoding process is viewed as a transmission through a channel, which input would be the input symbols, and its output, the output bits.
The class of AUH sources is known for their property of achieving minimum redundancy in several situations. It has been shown that AUH codes potentially achieve the minimum redundancy of a Huffman code of a source for which the probability of one of the symbols is known. The AUH codes are efficient in highly unbalanced cost regime, with minimal average cost among all prefix–free codes. These properties determine a wide range of applications and motivate for the study of these sources from the information theory perspective.
Starting from the AUH structure, the average codeword length, the code entropy and the average cost are derived. These results are customized for finite and infinite sources with different distributions (Poisson, negative binomial, geometric and exponential).

Bio
Daniela Tarniceriu (PhD. 1997) is a full professor at the Technical University “Gh. Asachi” of Iasi, Romania since 2001. Her research interests are in the fields of information theory, digital signal processing, statistical signal processing, data compression and encryption. She is the co-author of 8 books, 85 journal papers and 65 conference papers. She was involved in several research grants: two as scientific leader, two as coordinator, and 12 as scientist.
Since 2016, she is the Dean of the Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology (ETTI) of the Technical University “Gh. Asachi” of Iasi, Romania and between 2008 and 2016 she was the head of the “Telecommunications” Department of the ETTI. Since 2013 she is the head of the Doctoral School of the ETTI.


CITI Talk: “Event Detection in Nanoscale Networks via Molecular Communication” by Trang Mai, Queen’s University of Belfast on June, 16th – 14:00 in TD C

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Abstract

Recent advances in synthetic biology and chemistry are making it possible to form
networks consisting of nanoscale devices—known as nanomachines—with
applications in medicine and environmental protection. These nanoscale devices,
often known as nanomachines, have a limited ability to sense their environment,
communicate and take simple actions. A key potential application is therefore event
detection, where the nanoscale network seeks to identify the presence of an
undesirable state, such as markers of an illness.

To support event detection, the nanoscale network must be able to communicate
observations from sensing nanomachines to a fusion center, where a decision can
be made. Due to strict size and energy constraints, this communication is a
challenging problem. Recently, a new approach known as molecular communication
has been proposed, where information is encoded in the state of molecules, such as
the release time, number, or type of molecules, which diffuse from the transmitter to
the receiver through a fluid. This new medium has dramatically different features
than traditional electromagnetic and accoustic media, which requires new channel
models, as well as encoding and decoding strategies.

In this seminar, I will introduce the principles of molecular communication,
highlighting the differences from traditional communication schemes. I will then show
how molecular communication can support collaboration in nanoscale networks. In
particular, I will present a new event detection scheme for nanoscale networks,
which accounts for the unique characteristics of the underlying molecular
communication links—known as the anomalous diffusion channel.

Speaker biography

Mai Cong Trang currently is PhD candidate in Molecular Communications under the
supervision of Dr. Trung Q. Duong at Queen’s University Belfast and Dr. Malcolm
Egan at INSA Lyon. He received the B.S. degree in Electronic and Electrical
Engineering in 2008 at Le Quy Don Technical University, Vietnam. Then, in 2013, he
received the M.S. degree in Electronics and Communications Engineering at The
University of Electro‐Communications, Japan. His current research interests include
Molecular Communications, Nanomachine Networks and Bio-inspired Networks.

https://sites.google.com/view/maicongtrang/


CITI talks: “Modeling Energy Packets Networks with Markov chains: Analytical Solutions” by Jean-Michel Fourneau, UVSQ on 6th April

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In this talk, Jean-Michel Fourneau will present some analytic solutions of Queueing Network models that jointly model the data packets and the energy consumed by the transmission and reception. These models are based on the energy discretization, we talk then about energy Packets.

Bio

Jean-Michel Fourneau is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Versailles St Quentin, France since 1992. He was formerly with Ecole Nationale des Telecommnications, Paris and University of Paris XI Orsay as an Assistant Professor. He graduated in Statistics and Economy from Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l’Administation Economique, Paris and he obtained is PHD
and his habilitation in Computer Science at Paris XI Orsay in 87 and 91 respectively. He is a member of IFIP WG7.3. His recent research interests are
algorithmic performance evaluation, Stochastic Automata Networks, G-networks, stochastic bounds, and application to high speed networks, all optical networks and energy consumption.


CITI Talk: “POETS : partially ordered event triggered systems”, Dr David Thomas, Imperial College on 5th April 16:00

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POETS : partially ordered event triggered systems

The POETS project is a five-year effort to build a combined software and hardware system which allows applications to be split into 1M+ concurrent state machines, and then to execute them on 100K+ concurrent hardware threads across 100+ tightly-coupled compute nodes. To achieve this we use an event-driven compute system with no global barriers or shared state, and re-write applications to use globally asynchronous algorithms. This talk will give an overview of the hardware that is being built, and show how applications such as finite-volume solvers can be re-cast as a asynchronous system.

 


CITI Talk: “Two Channels with Almost No Benefit from CSI”, by Ligong Wang, on 27th March

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The next CITI talk will take place on 27th March at 3 pm in room TD-C.

This talk entitled “Two Channels with Almost No Benefit from CSI” will be presented by Ligong Wang.

Abstract

For many communication channels, causal or noncausal channel-state information (CSI) at the transmitter can help to significantly increase their communication capacity. In this talk we discuss two channels for which this is not the case. The first is the very noisy channel. We show that noncausal CSI at the transmitter provides little additional capacity improvement over causal CSI. The second channel is the Poisson channel with random, time-varying dark current. On this channel, capacity improvement from both causal and noncausal CSI is shown to be negligible.

Speaker biography

Ligong Wang received the B.E. degree in electronic engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 2004 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from ETH Zurich, Switzerland, in 2006 and 2011 respectively. In the years 2011-2014, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA . He is now a researcher (chargé de recherche) with CNRS, France, and is affiliated with ETIS laboratory in Cergy-Pontoise. His research interests include classical and quantum information theory, and digital, in particular optical communications.


CITI Talk: “Broadcasting with delayed CSIT: finite SNR analysis and heterogeneous feedback”, by Chao HE, on 15th March

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The next CITI talk will take place on 15th March at 11 am in Amphi Chappe.

This talk entitled “Broadcasting with delayed CSIT: finite SNR analysis and heterogeneous feedback” will be presented by Chao HE.

Abstract

One of the key techniques for future wireless networks, namely state-feedback enabled interference mitigation, is explored with information theoretical tools under some realistic settings. In order to verify the usefulness of delayed CSIT in harsh situations, we investigate it with finite SNR and/or feedback heterogeneity in a broadcast communication setup. In the first part of this talk, we are mainly interested in showing the finite SNR performance of delayed CSIT and the similarity between the results in Gaussian and erasure channels. Several relatively simple schemes are proposed in multi-user broadcast channels when states are assumed to be fully known at the destinations but only strictly causally at the transmitter. Enhancement in terms of higher symmetric rates and more input alphabet options are then characterized when analyzing the corresponding regions in Gaussian/erasure cases. In the second part of this talk, algorithms adapted to heterogeneous feedback are targeted as only part of communication nodes are involved in the feedback process. In particular, we concentrate on 1) broadcast channel with feedback from partial receivers, 2) broadcast relay channel with feedback at the relay. Improvements on achievable rates are justified in either cases via analysis and some examples.

Speaker biography

Chao He received his B.E. degree in Electrical Engineering from Southeast University in 2012, and the M.Sc. degree in SAR from Supélec in 2013. He obtained the Ph.D. degree from CentraleSupélec of Université Paris Saclay in 2016. His current research interests lie in the areas of multi-user information theory and limited feedback.


CITI Talk: “​​Challenges of a Reflective Platform”, by Stéphane Ducasse, on 24th November

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The next CITI talk will take place on 24th November at 11 am in Amphi Chappe.

This talk entitled “Challenges of a Reflective Platform” will be presented by Stéphane Ducasse directeur de recherche at Inria-Lille..

Abstract

Pharo is a live programming reflective dynamic language and environment. His tools are delivering an excellent programmer experience and are heavy user of its reflective abilities.
In this talk we will present briefly Pharo an immersive reflective platform and programming language (www.pharo.org) and focused on:
(1) the problems we encounter daily (how to update core libraries while they are used to execute the updater itself, how can we get VM execution benefit from hot state right at system startup and without warming up, how can we isolate reflective parts of the system, what are the code representations we need to make happy the VMs and IDE)
(2) the infrastructure that we would like to have: since we are able to bootstrap the core of the system under 80 k, we can start thinking about multiple versions of the system coexisting, the question of the memory model is then important. Another question is how can we build a system where users can decide when they want to move code from one version to the other ones. Similarly, we would like to resume work on PharoNoOS and work on Xen hypervisor to gain benefit of hot hotspot and fast boot time.

Speaker biography

Stéphane is directeur de recherche at Inria. He has more than 20 years of experience in software maintenance. He leads the RMoD (rmod.lille.inria.fr) team. He is expert in two domains: object-oriented language design and reengineering.  He worked on traits, composable groups of methods. Traits have been introduced in  Pharo, Perl, PHP and  under a variant into Scala, Fortress of SUN Microsystems.  He is also expert on software quality, program understanding, program visualizations, reengineering and metamodeling. He is one of the developer of Moose, an open-source software analysis platform www.moosetechnology.org.  He created www.synectique.eu a company building dedicated tools for advanced software analysis. He is one of the visionary core developers behind Pharo www.pharo.org a new exciting reflective and immersive dynamically-typed language. According to google, his h-index is 49 for about 10 K citations. He is writing some new books around Pharo and having fun building a great and exciting system.


CITI Talk: “​​Who will drive cars ? Public Vehicles for Future Urban Transportation”, by Min-You Wu, on 8th November

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The next CITI talk will take place on 8th November at 10.30 am in Amphi Chappe.

This talk entitled “Who will drive cars ? Public Vehicles for Future Urban Transportation” will be presented by Min-You Wu, from Shangai Jiao-Tong, China.

Abstract

Urban transportation is undergoing a dramatic change. Conventional transportation consisting of private vehicles, taxis and buses will be substituted by trip service with autonomous vehicles. Transition from owning private vehicles to purchasing trip service is one of the most revolutionary changes in this century.
In this talk we discuss issues of autonomous trip services. We will discuss cost reduction of trip services. Three most important factors for low-cost trip services are manpower, energy and ridesharing. We focus on the ridesharing problem. We will discuss various techniques to increasing the sharing factor including passenger transfer, incentive mechanism and advanced booking.
We propose a new paradigm of transportation system for future smart cities, namely, Public Vehicles (PVs). With PVs, the number of vehicles as well as the required parking space will be significantly reduced. There will be less traffic congestion, less energy consumption and less pollution. The key issue of implementing an effective PV system is to design efficient planning and scheduling algorithms. We compare the PV system with conventional systems.

Speaker biography

Min-You Wu is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He serves as the Chief Scientist at Grid Center of Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He is a research professor of the University of New Mexico, USA. His research interests include wireless and sensor networks, vehicular networks, multimedia networking, parallel and distributed systems, and compilers for parallel computers. He has published over 200 journal and conference papers in the above areas. His research has been supported by National Science Foundation, DoD, DoE, DARPA, China 863 program, China 973 program, Ministry of Education of China and Natural Science Foundation of China. He is a Vice Chair of Technical Committee of Computer Architecture, CCF. He is a senior member of IEEE and CCF.


CITI Talk: “​​Research presentation”, by Mohammad Rmayti, on 21st October

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Mohammad RMAYTI, nouvel ATER IF/CITI, va présenter ses travaux de recherche dans le cadre d’un séminaire d’équipe DYNAMID, vendredi 21 octobre à 10h dans le pot de yaourt.

Résumé

Avec l’évolution des besoins d’utilisateurs, plusieurs technologies de réseaux sans fil ont été développées. Parmi ces technologies, nous trouvons les réseaux mobiles ad hoc (MANETs) qui ont été conçus pour assurer la communication dans le cas où le déploiement d’une infrastructure réseaux est coûteux ou inapproprié. Dans ces réseaux, le routage est une fonction primordiale où chaque entité mobile joue le rôle d’un routeur et participe activement dans le routage. Cependant, les protocoles de routage ad hoc tel qu’ils sont conçus manquent de contrôle de sécurité. Sur un chemin emprunté, un nœud malveillant peut violemment perturber le routage en bloquant le trafic. Dans cette thèse, nous proposons une solution de détection des nœuds malveillants dans un réseau MANET basée sur l’analyse comportementale à travers les filtres Bayésiens et les chaînes de Markov. L’idée de notre solution consiste à évaluer le comportement d’un nœud en fonction de ses échanges avec ses voisins d’une manière complètement décentralisée. Par ailleurs, un modèle stochastique est utilisé afin de prédire la nature de comportement d’un nœud et vérifier sa fiabilité avant d’emprunter un chemin. Notre solution a été validée via de nombreuses simulations sur le simulateur NS-2. Les résultats montrent que la solution proposée permet de détecter avec précision les nœuds malveillants et d’améliorer la qualité de services de réseaux MANETs.

Biographie

Après une Licence en Informatique à la Faculté des Sciences de l’Université Libanaise, j’ai fait mon Master 2 Recherche en Gestion des Risques dans les systèmes d’information à l’Ecole Doctorale de l’Université Libanaise. Intéressé par la sécurité de réseaux informatiques, j’ai effectué mon stage de recherche à l’Utt-Troyes sur la détection d’attaques DoS dans les réseaux VoIP. J’ai commencé ma thèse à l’UTT en codirection avec le Groupe Sécurité de Réseaux à Télécom ParisTech, qui portait sur la détection d’attaques DoS dans les réseaux mobiles ad hoc (MANETs). J’ai soutenu mes travaux de recherche le 30 septembre 2016.